2022 Whole Foods Health and Wellness Trends

Happy New Year! The start of the New Year brings with it a wave of new trends in food, health, and wellness. Just last year, Whole Foods Market announced their predictions of the top 10 food trends to expect this year in 2022.

Now that the New Year is here, we could not be more excited to see (and taste) these latest trends. Here are the top ten beverages, foods, and lifestyle practices predicted to start filling grocery store shelves later this year: 

  • Buzz-Less Spirits
  • Functional Fizz
  • Grains That Give Back
  • Hibiscus is Happening
  • Moringa’s Moment
  • Reducetarianism
  • Seize the Sunflower Seeds 
  • Turmeric Takes Off
  • Ultra Urban Farming
  • You Do Yuzu

 This year’s predictions appeared in Whole Foods Market’s annual trends report and were compiled by Whole Foods Market’s Trends Council, a team of culinary experts and industry leaders who source items and spot trends across Whole Foods Markets nationwide.

We are excited to see all of these trends hit grocery store shelves next year and beyond! Here is a little bit more about each of these trends you may want to try.

#1 Buzz-Less Spirits

Step aside cocktails, mocktails are the beverage of choice this year. As the sober-curious movement continues to grow in popularity, buzz-less beverages are entering the scene and seem like they are here to stay. These drinks provide the elegance, sophistication, and taste of traditional cocktails without the alcohol or additional buzz that accompanies alcoholic beverages. Cheers to that!

#2 Functional Fizz

Speaking of beverages, functional fizzy drinks are another trend to belly up to the bar for this year. Sparkling drinks not only taste great, but they are now doubling down on functional ingredients. Think of things like prebiotics, probiotics, and tasty botanicals that balance out the flavor of these beverages. From fresh and fruity to savory and sweet, expect to see some unconventional ingredients in your bubbly drinks this year.

#3 Grains that Give Back

Grains are great, but they are even better this year as many grocery grains are beginning to refocus on the environment and our planet as a whole. We are referring to grains that are grown using agricultural and farming practices that help address things like soil health. Start checking the brands you buy from and see if they support more mindful practices such as these.

#4 Hibiscus is Happening

According to Whole Foods, hibiscus has a delicious and long history in the world of teas. Many tea drinkers have kept hibiscus in their tea time rotations for its vitamin C content. Now, many beverage and food companies are harnessing hibiscus’s signature hot pink hue and slightly sweet yet tangy tart flavor in the form of craft beverages, fruit spreads, and yogurts. This year, keep your eyes peeled for the alluring hot pink color on store shelves.

#5 Moringa is Having a Moment

Moringa is a tree that most commonly grows in the tropics. This tree produces leaves that have a vibrant color and a matcha-esque taste that can give a subtle hint of flavor and nutrients to recipes including baked goods, sauces, and smoothies. Naturally caffeine-free, moringa is a great alternative to coffee and other teas. It is also used in skin products. Plus, it is loaded with amino acids, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins, so expect to see it added to desserts, grain blends, and protein bars this year.

#6 Reducetarianism

Founded by Brian Kateman, the reducetarianism trend focuses on reducing the consumption of dairy, eggs, and meat, without cutting them out of our daily diet entirely.  Whole Foods says, “When animal products are on the menu, reducetarians make them count, opting for premium grass-fed meat and pasture-raised eggs.”

Reducetarianiam is a perfect trend for those individuals who are plant-based curious. This means you are not yet fully on board with committing to a plant-based diet and lifestyle full-time, but you are open to the idea of incorporating more plants into your diet and lifestyle. Think of reducetarianism as having the best of both worlds!

#7 Seize the Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are a great go-to food for on the go, but this year sunflower seeds are branching out to more than just ballpark snacks. They are sliding into cheeses, crackers, and even ice cream. Small, yet mighty, sunflower seeds provide protein and unsaturated fats. If you prefer your seeds in a spread, try sunflower seed butter, which pairs perfectly with your favorite flavor of It’s NOLA.

#8 Turmeric Takes Off

Known as the golden spice, turmeric is totally taking off this year. Turmeric is what gives curry its vibrant yellow-orange color, which can often be detected in Indian cuisine. While golden milk lattes and turmeric supplements are well-known in the wellness world, turmeric is starting to make an appearance in other foods like cereals, plant-based ice creams, and savory sauerkrauts. We guess you could say people want to have their turmeric and eat it too!

#9 Ultra Urban Farming

From aquaponics to hydroponics to fresh and sustainably grown greens, farmers and producers are finding creative and new ways to push the boundaries of traditional farming to maximize efficiency. Color us impressed!


Yuzu fruit
#10 You Do Yuzu

Yuzu, a lesser-known citrus mainly cultivated and grown in China, Japan, and Korea provides a sour yet tart flavor that is showing up in products like condiments, hard seltzers, and vinaigrettes. Used to accent dishes like fish, noodles, soups, and vegetables, this tangerine-sized fruit is providing a pop of flavor to recipes in 2022.

As you venture out to the local grocery stores in your community, be on the lookout for these top ten trends to watch for this year.

- Stay Healthy and Happy

Need some new recipe ideas for the New Year? Check out @MBVeganShare or join our CEO live @itsnolasnack every other Sunday when she shares some delicious and nutritious vegan recipes. Don’t worry, even if you aren’t vegan, you will still enjoy these dishes.

Tag us @itsnolasnack so we can see how you enjoy this year’s new trends.